Life of a Coverlet Worker

Many people believe that the life of a coverlet worker consists of just hanging up coverlets and that’s about it. Well, sorry to burst your bubble but you’re wrong.

First off, coverlet workers come in many forms and fashions. Currently at the McCarl coverlet gallery, we have US students and International students from Jamaica and from Trinidad and Tobago as work studies. Another thing to note is that all of us are different majors, we are not all history majors. We have a blend of science, mathematics, communication, history, and business and any one of these concentrations can be used to create an exhibit.

When it comes to creating the exhibit, there are a lot of behind-the-scenes thing that a lot of people do not think about. As work study students, we do research such as find background on the weavers or the materials used or the style/patterns on the coverlet. We advertise by taking flyers out to the neighboring towns to shop owners and businesses. We paint the rods for the coverlets to be draped and we hand sew the sleeves onto the coverlets so that they could be hung. And this process of research can take months. When the exhibit is completed after its designated time period, we take down the coverlets and put them back into the order in which we found based off of the Gallery’s cataloging system. During the current exhibit we’re usually behind the scenes, preparing for the upcoming exhibit. We’re constantly researching and gathering information, so that we can share our knowledge with everyone who walks in.

And there you have it. The life of a coverlet worker in a nutshell. We aim to share our knowledge of the current exhibit because we want to share what we already knew and what we discovered through our findings. We do our best to make our exhibits fun and easy to understand so that you can always come back (and bring more friends along).

So come and visit The Foster and Muriel McCarl Coverlet Gallery. You’ll be amazed at what you learn! :)

 

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One comment

  1. Thanks for the insight!

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